Study: Nutritional Supplements Don’t Ward Off Depression

MONDAY, March 11, 2019 (HealthDay News) — Taking vitamin pills and other supplements won’t prevent depression, but promoting better eating habits might help, new research suggests.

The study included more than 1,000 overweight or obese people in the United Kingdom, the Netherlands, Germany, and Spain who were at risk for depression but were not currently depressed.

Excess weight is often linked with depression, the researchers noted.

Half of the study participants took daily supplements containing folic acid, vitamin D, omega-3 fish oils, zinc, and selenium. Half took a placebo pill.

In a one-year follow-up, the researchers discovered that the supplements worked no better than the placebo in helping ward off depression.

Similarly, the counseling was not effective overall, though it seemed to help prevent depression in participants who attended a recommended number of sessions.

That suggests counseling works only if people get an adequate “dose” of therapy and make significant changes in their diet, according to the study published March 5 in the Journal of the American Medical Association.

Read the full article at Health Day