Research Suggests: You May Want To Pass On The Multivitamins

You’re not getting enough vitamin D in the winter, you have a sneaking suspicion you’re iron deficient, and since cutting out dairy, you’ve felt like you may be lacking on the calcium front. But instead of taking a dozen different vitamins, you’re opting instead for a single multivitamin, because of #efficiency. Well, unfortunately, you may want to rethink that decision: According to a recent report from the independent testing group ConsumerLab, 46 percent of multivitamins don’t do what they claim.

Of the 35 popular multivitamins tested for nutrients including folic acid, calcium, and vitamin A, nearly half contained either less of or more of what was advertised and claimed on the bottle.

Of the 35 popular multivitamins tested for nutrients including folic acid, calcium, and vitamin A, nearly half contained either less of or more of what was advertised and claimed on the bottle, and both of those situations can be harmful and unhealthy for your body, Reader’s Digest reported.

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